Some thoughts upon the spirit of infallibility claimed by the Church of Rome
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Some thoughts upon the spirit of infallibility claimed by the Church of Rome offer"d at the anniversary Dudleian-Lecture, at Harvard-College in Cambridge, May ll, 1757 by Edward Wigglesworth

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Published by Printed and sold by John Draper ... in Boston, New-England .
Written in

Subjects:

  • Catholic Church -- Controversial literature -- Early works to 1800.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesDoctor Wigglesworth"s discourse at the Dudleian-Lecture, Infallibility of the Church of Rome briefly considered
Statementby Edward Wigglesworth ...
ContributionsAmerican Imprint Collection (Library of Congress)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBX1763 .W65 1757
The Physical Object
Pagination31, [1] p. ;
Number of Pages31
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL776801M
LC Control Number97177799

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Some thoughts upon the spirit of infallibility, claimed by the Church of Rome: offer'd at the anniversary Dudleian-Lecture, at Harvard-College in Cambridge, May Author: Edward Wigglesworth. Some thoughts upon the spirit of infallibility, claimed by the Church of Rome: offer'd at the anniversary Dudleian-Lecture, at Harvard-College in Cambridge, May / By Edward Wigglesworth, D.D. And Hollisian Professor of Divinity. By ca. Author: ca. Edward Wigglesworth. Davis, ), by Matthew Poole (HTML at EEBO TCP) Some thoughts upon the spirit of infallibility, claimed by the Church of Rome: offer'd at the anniversary Dudleian-Lecture, at Harvard-College in Cambridge, May / By Edward Wigglesworth, D.D. And Hollisian Professor of Divinity.   In his work Innocent III and the Crown of Aragon: The Limits of Papal Authority, Damian Smith shares the words that Giovanni Capocci is supposed to have said to that Pope: ‘Your words are God’s words, but your works are those of the Devil.’As Smith notes, Innocent III (d. ) had his supporters and critics, and while I am unfamiliar with Capocci, he was .

The Catholic Church teaches that the coming of the Holy Spirit upon the apostles, in an event known as Pentecost, signaled the beginning of the public ministry of the Church. Catholics hold that Saint Peter was Rome's first bishop and the consecrator of Linus as its next bishop, thus starting the unbroken line which includes the current pontiff. Some thoughts upon the spirit of infallibility, claimed by the Church of Rome: offer'd at the anniversary Dudleian-Lecture, at Harvard-College in Cambridge, May / By Edward Wigglesworth, D.D. And Hollisian Professor of Divinity. Wigglesworth, Edward, ca. . Thoughts of a Recluse by Austin O'Malley (, Paperback) Thoughts of a: $ of Recluse a Thoughts by (, O'Malley Austin Paperback) Paperback) Austin O'Malley of by Recluse (, Thoughts a. Some thoughts upon the spirit of infallibility, claimed by the Church of Rome: offer'd at the anniversary Dudleian-Lecture, at Harvard-College in Cambridge, May / By Edward Wigglesworth, D.D.

Nature of infallibility The church teaches that infallibility is a charism entrusted by Christ to the whole church, whereby the Pope, as "head of the college of bishops," enjoys p. The infallibility of the Church is the belief that the Holy Spirit preserves the Christian Church from errors that would contradict its essential doctrines. It is related to, but not the same as, indefectible, that is, "she remains and will remain the Institution of Salvation, founded by Christ, until the end of the world.".   The following is excerpted from the book written by Christopher Wordsworth D.D., titled "Union with Rome: Is not the Church of Rome the Babylon of the Book of Revelation?" Click on link to download a PDF of the whole book. Chapter 1 is here. Chapter 2: Whether Babylon In The Apocalypse Is The Church Of Rome We now advance. With the Edict of Thessalonica in AD, Emperor Theodosius I made Nicene Christianity the Empire's state religion. The Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and the Catholic Church each claim to stand in continuity with the church to which Theodosius granted recognition, but do not look on it as a creation of the Roman Empire.. Earlier in the 4th century, .